Yearly Archives: 2018

PrEP is the Latest in HIV Prevention and Treatment

PrEP, or pre-exposure prophylaxis, is a once-daily pill that can reduce your chance of getting HIV by more than 90%. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 1.1 million people in the United States may benefit from taking PrEP, but only 7% were prescribed it in 2016. Spreading awareness about PrEP is important, especially here in the South where the need for prevention methods is higher than the amount of people using them. While more...

World AIDS Day Campaign Aims to Find a Cure by 2030

The 30th annual World AIDS Day is taking place December 1, 2018 to raise awareness about the disease and the fight against HIV infection. The day also shows support for those living with HIV, and remembers those who have lost their lives to an AIDS-related illness. The first ever global health day dedicated to AIDS awareness took place in 1988, according to the World AIDS Day Campaign. Today, there are an estimated 36.7 million people living with an HIV infection globally. The...

HIV Vaccine To Begin Human Trials in 2019

A promising HIV vaccine candidate demonstrated its power by neutralizing HIV strains in mice, guinea pigs and monkeys, and is almost ready for human testing. The findings were published on June 4th in the journal Nature Medicine, and it was led by investigators from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, which falls under the National Institutes of Health. Chief of the Structural Biology Section at the NIAID Vaccine Research Center Peter D. Kwong, Ph.D and John R. Mascola, M.D., center director, spearheaded...

HIV-Negative Child Receives Liver Transplant from HIV-Positive Mother

An HIV-negative child received a liver transplant from its HIV-positive mother and now appears to have no evidence of HIV infection apart from a very weak antibody response. The case is the first reported transplant from an HIV-positive donor to an HIV-negative recipient and raises the question of whether transmission through the donor organ might be preventable if the recipient begins antiretroviral therapy as preventive therapy prior to the transplant. The infant’s mother was diagnosed with HIV approximately six months before conceiving,...

HIV Eliminated From Six Patients Using Stem Cells

Doctors believe six people afflicted with HIV have had the virus eliminated from their body and one may even have been completely cured of the virus, according to a study published in the journal Annals of Internal Medicine. The study was carried out by scientists from the Institute of AIDS Research in Barcelona and the Gregorio Marañón Hospital in Madrid, Spain, and gives new hope to developing a reliable HIV cure. The success was achieved by using stem cell transplants. After...

Monthly Shots could Replace Daily Pills for HIV Treatment and Prevention

New results are raising hopes for easing one challenge of living with HIV: the need to take daily pills for life, both to ward off HIV/AIDS and to lower the risk of transmitting the virus to others. Missing doses can also foster the emergence of HIV drug resistance, a danger both to the person receiving treatment and to entire populations. Now, a large-scale study has shown over 48 weeks that monthly injections of two long-acting anti-HIV drugs work just as...

HIV Prevention Pill Reaching More People who Need It

More than one in nine people worldwide who might benefit from a daily pill to minimize their risk of getting HIV are now taking this medicine, a research review suggests. PrEP is highly protective against HIV, but many people worldwide don’t get this pill because they aren’t aware of it or because it’s unavailable or unaffordable. It’s recommended for people at high risk for infection with HIV, including men who have sex with men, people who inject illegal drugs, and some people...

People taking HIV-prevention pill may get more primary care

When people take daily pills to minimize their chances of getting HIV, they are also more likely to get routine care like flu shots and recommended screenings for common health problems, a U.S. study suggests. So-called HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is highly protective against HIV, and patients taking this daily pill also tend to get tested and treated more often for hepatitis C and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), researchers note in the American Journal of Public Health. But many people who...

Increased Use of Truvada for PrEP Linked to Decline in New HIV Cases

Results from a nationwide analysis on the impact of Truvada for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) showed that its use resulted in significant declines in new HIV infections in the US from 2012 to 2016. Findings from the study were presented at the 22nd International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2018) in Amsterdam. Using the National HIV Surveillance System and national pharmacy data, researchers from Emory University Rollins School of Public Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that across the US, the prevalence...

Why Don’t More Americans Use PrEP?

On July 3, 1981, this newspaper wrote about a “rare cancer” killing gay men in New York and California. Though few knew it, what followed would be a generation-defining battle: for attention, for legitimacy, for our very lives. Today, after 37 years, we finally have a proven pathway to ending the AIDS epidemic in this country. The only catch? Poor policy and pharmaceutical price-gouging have blocked the way, making critical drugs a luxury rather than an imperative. The solution comes in a...